The Super Blue Blood Moon: not so super, nor so rare!

A recent phenomenon that seems to excite the media time and again to the astonishment of astronomers is that of the supermoon. This week though, we hit the jackpot with a Moon that was simultaneously super, blue and blood. All kinds of photos appeared in the media, some of which most definitely were not of [...]

The Star of Bethlehem: An Afterthought

Afterthought (January 16th 2018): One note to add that bears remembering. As was pointed out in post #9, we know that Chinese records from the period between 20 BC and 1 AD are almost certainly incomplete. In this twenty year period there are just four records. If we follow the conventional reasoning, two of these [...]

Star of Bethlehem X: Trying to Explain the Star

My apologies that this wrap-up piece has been delayed. I had intended to have it posted on January 1st, but the previous posting took longer to complete than I expected and, after that date, other commitments stopped me writing for a time. ------------------- After our walk through the evidence and through the different theories for [...]

How many Apollo astronauts are still alive?

One of the greatest features of a Herschel mission lunch in the canteen – although most of the Herschel veterans around the table have now moved on to other missions – is the remarkable conversations. A topic comes up and a bunch of scientists and engineers start ruminating on it. These days the topic is [...]

Star of Bethlehem IX Ancient Observational Records II: China

Chinese Skies For many years the Chinese observations from 5 and 4 BC have created confusion. We have two, similar records in similar dates of consecutive years. First, the Chi’en-han-shu. Chinese records generally use three words to describe new objects in the sky: k'o-hsing, or Guest Star, for novae; hui-hsing, or Broom Star, for a [...]